Brake Hose

Brake Hose Given that both your brake hose and pipe play a vital role in helping your brakes to function, it's only right that your vehicle won't pass its MOT if they are worn out. The brake hose carries hydraulic fluid from the brake pipe to the callipers, forcing the callipers together and clamping the brake pads around the rotors when you place your foot on the brake pedal. The brake pipe is a rigid (usually steel – which can corrode over time) pipe that transfers pressurised brake fluid from the master cylinder, where brake fluid is stored, to the brake hoses. The brake hose is made of flexible, reinforced rubber piping that is designed to withstand oil and water as well as the high pressure exerted when the braking system is in use; however, being constantly exposed to the elements and in regular movement, it will, eventually, wear out. It’s essential to replace a worn hose or braking will be affected; this safety issue would result in a failed MOT. Brake failure is certainly not worth the risk. Make sure you check the integrity of your braking system regularly.

It’s easy to forget the importance of a Brake Hose among the many parts that make up a braking system. In simple terms, the Brake Hose is a safety critical item on all vehicles. Operating under extreme stress whenever the brakes are used, they need to be checked regularly, as any faults will lead to a loss of brake fluid. This will mean a drop-in pressure, which can lead to catastrophic brake failure. The only way to find out whether a Brake Hose is working properly or not is to carry out a visual inspection. If cracks or leaks are visible it could be an indication that the whole brake network is damaged, as most brake parts wear out at the same rate as each other. We recommend that Brake Hoses are changed every five years or 31,000 miles (50,000 km) to make sure that safety isn’t compromised at any point.

The fluid in the car's braking system runs from the master cylinder to the brakes themselves mainly via rigid metal pipes. But there needs to be some flexibility in the system to allow the wheels to move in relation to the car body, whether for the purposes of steering or suspension. This is provided by fitting flexible brake hoses. The fluid in the car's braking system runs from the master cylinder to the brakes themselves mainly via rigid metal pipes. But there needs to be some flexibility in the system to allow the wheels to move in relation to the car body, whether for the purposes of steering or suspension. This is provided by fitting flexible brake hoses.

At the rear there is usually one hose if your car has a live axle or two if it has independent rear suspension. At the front of the car, these hoses run between the pipes and the brakes. The same arrangement is used at the rear if the car has independent rear suspension. But if it has a live axle, there is usually just one hose situated in the centre of the axle, linking the pipe from the master cylinder to the pipes leading to the rear brakes. If you suspect that you have a leak in the braking system, one possible source is the hoses, which should be checked straight away.

If you are inspecting the front hoses, turn the road wheel on to full lock to give yourself a better view. For the rear hoses, you may find you need to use an inspection lamp to see them. Inspect the whole surface of the hose, looking for cracks and chafed or worn patches. Ask a friend to press the brake pedal while you feel the hose to see if it expands. If one of the hoses fails any of these tests, you need to replace it. At the same time, it is safer to replace all the hoses because they will all probably be the same age.

    The way in which the hoses are plumbed into the rest of the braking system depends on what they are attached to. If the hose joins a pipe, it will be secured to the bodywork by a bracket so that the hose cannot get damaged by flexing with the car's movements. The end of the hose has a metal union on it that passes through the bracket and is held by a nut on the other side. The hose joins to the pipe via a male and female union - the male formed by the hose and the female by the pipe. Where the hose runs into the brake assembly, there are three possible designs of connection. One is a banjo connection, in which the end of the hose consists of a metal ring. The ring is fixed to the assembly by a hollow bolt - hollow so that it will still allow fluid through to the brake. The two other alternatives are that the hose screws straight into the caliper, or that it is attached to the brake assembly by a union similar to that between the hose and the brake pipe. Before you start removing hoses, fit a plastic bag between the top of the brake fluid reservoir and its cap to minimize the loss of brake fluid. Also have a roll of cling film and some rubber bands at hand to cover up any holes that become exposed when you remove the hose.

    Brake hoses transfer the brake fluid from the master cylinder (brake fluid reservoir) to the brake calipers or wheel cylinders. Brake hoses are made of rubber and it is common for a brake hose to become hard and brittle, causing cracks and leaks. When that happens, you will notice fluid under your car or on the wheels.

    Brake Hose and Brake Pipe. The brake hose is made of flexible, reinforced rubber piping that is designed to withstand oil and water as well as the high pressure exerted when the braking system is in use; however, being constantly exposed to the elements and in regular movement, it will, eventually, wear out.

    This pressure could be caused by a bad brake hose. Like the brake hose, over time the caliper piston can wear down and become torn. The piston has a rubber boot around it and if this becomes torn or worn down, debris and rust can build up. You can either shop around for a brake caliper rebuild kit or buy a new caliper.

    Sometimes, the worst part of getting your car fixed is having to bring it to the garage. We are therefore happy to offer our customers a free collection and delivery service If you prearrange a collection, we will pick your car up from your home or place of work and drive it to our premises, carry out all the necessary work (having consulted you) and deliver it back to you at the end of the day.

    We are able to tow, jump start or repair your vehicle if you are experiencing problems or broken down for a small fee. If we can’t sadly start your vehicle, we can contact a local recovery firm to collect your vehicle for a very competitive price.

    • Don't want to waste your day off?
    • You don't have the time to take your car in for a service or repairs?
    • Have you got problems with getting to and from the garage?

    Here at Many Autos, we believe that we offer a valuable product with our Free Collection and Delivery Service, we can collect either from your place of work or from your home address. If you are unsure about whether the address you are considering having your vehicle collected from is not within our range, then please do contact us.

    Many Autos operate a fleet of pool cars with a dedicated driver, so wherever we are collecting from, we need to be able to leave one of our pool vehicles either in your work car park / parking space, or if in a residential area, we would need to be able to leave our car either at your house or on the road with a permit if required. We would be grateful if you could bear this in mind when booking to use our free Collection and delivery service